Plantation General Hospital
954.587.5010
Plantation General Hospital is a full-service facility that has been providing a range of healthcare services to residents of Plantation and Central Broward County for 40 years.

Answering Common Questions About Heart Failure

heart failure plantation

Heart failure is commonly thought of as a condition in which the heart stops working. In fact, it occurs when the heart cannot pump enough blood to fulfill the body’s needs. Heart failure can occur over time and it may lead to other serious complications that might require a quick trip to the ER at Plantation General Hospital. Although heart failure is not curable, it is manageable.

Am I at risk of heart failure?
Consider talking to your physician about whether you could be at risk of heart failure. It is more common among people with diabetes, high blood pressure, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Your risk might also be elevated if you have sleep apnea, a prior history of heart attack, congenital heart defects, valvular heart disease, heart arrhythmias, or obesity. Some lifestyle habits are associated with an increased risk of heart failure, such as tobacco use and heavy alcohol use.

What are the signs of heart failure?
If you notice any abnormal changes, consider bringing them to the attention of your doctor. Heart failure is typically indicated by shortness of breath, persistent wheezing or coughing, and swelling in the abdomen or lower body. Fatigue, nausea, and loss of appetite are other possible signs of heart failure.

How is heart failure diagnosed?
After evaluating your symptoms, reviewing your medical history, and performing a physical exam, your physician might recommend some tests to check whether you could have heart failure. Chest X-ray images might reveal enlargement of the heart and fluid buildup in the lungs. An echocardiogram uses sound waves to show your doctor the shape and size of your heart, and check how well it is pumping. You might also be asked to take a stress test. During this test, your cardiovascular function is evaluated while you walk on a treadmill or pedal a stationary bicycle. Other tests that might be helpful include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scans, electrocardiogram (ECG), and coronary angiogram.

At Plantation General Hospital, you’ll find comprehensive diagnostic services, including stress tests, echocardiograms, and chest X-rays. We also offer emergency care in Plantation, FL, in addition to robotic surgery, cardiovascular surgery, and psychiatric care. If you have general questions about our cardiovascular services, you can call our Consult-A-Nurse line at 954-321-4099.


Getting Back on Your Feet After Hip Surgery

Getting Back on Your Feet After Hip Surgery

Your orthopedic care plan may include hip surgery if you have fractured a hip or developed severe symptoms of osteoarthritis. Hip replacement surgery is a common intervention for patients who have not found sufficient relief of their symptoms from conservative treatment measures. The best time to plan for your post-surgery recovery is before you have the procedure, rather than afterward. Your orthopedic care team at Plantation General Hospital will help you learn what to expect from the recovery process.

Assistive Devices

Your doctor may ask you to purchase or rent some durable medical equipment for your recovery at home. You may need to use a walker, crutches, or a cane for a while. The physical therapist will show you how to use these devices before you leave the hospital. Because you’ll need to be careful with activities that require bending, you may also wish to purchase a sponge or loofah attached to a long handle, a long-handled shoehorn, and a “reacher” or grabbing tool.

Physical Activity

Your doctor will let you know when you can resume your normal activities, such as driving, working, and exercising. For the time being, exercise caution about weight-bearing activities. Your physical therapist will show you how to stretch and exercise gently in ways that will not adversely affect your hip joint. He or she may recommend gradually resuming low-impact activities such as walking, swimming, ad golfing.

Everyday Habits

Before you leave the hospital, you’ll be given a list of precautions to follow for about six to eight weeks. These precautions will vary, depending on the specific surgical technique that was used. In general, hip replacement patients are advised to avoid crossing the legs when sitting, bringing the knees higher than the hip, or leaning forward while sitting down. You may be asked not to bend at the waist greater than 90 degrees, which may include simple activities like reaching down for an extra blanket while in bed.

After you undergo hip surgery at The Orthopedic Center in Plantation, FL, The Rehabilitation Medicine Unit of Plantation General Hospital can help you get back on your feet. Call our Consult-A-Nurse line at 954-321-4099 to request a referral to an orthopedic care specialist. Our community hospital also connects families to specialists in pediatric orthopedics.


Taking Care of Yourself When Your Child Is in the NICU

NICU plantation

The birth of a child is a joyous occasion, but when the child is in critical condition, parents must cope with emotional challenges. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is specially designed to closely monitor and care for newborns who are born prematurely or who otherwise have special medical needs. When a child is in the NICU, parents can reach out to the maternity care staff at Plantation General Hospital for extra support and guidance.

Become an Informed Patient
When a baby is in the NICU, often the most difficult feeling for parents to cope with is the feeling of helplessness. You might feel as though there’s little you can do to help your child, but actually, it’s still possible to stay involved in his or her care. Use the time to learn as much as you can about your baby’s medical needs. Ask the maternity care staff for printouts to read and ask about taking parent education classes from the NICU staff. Learn everything you can about caring for your baby after he or she is cleared to return home with you.

Accept Offers of Support
During this time, your family and friends might want to help you, but they might not be sure of what they can do. Accept any offers of help you receive and make a list of things others can do for you. Since you’ll be in the hospital longer than you’d expected, perhaps you need someone to walk your dog, take care of your other children, or bring extra clothing and other personal items from home.

Get in Touch with Your Emotions
After childbirth, it’s normal for your hormone levels to fluctuate. The added stress of having a newborn with medical issues can make it even more difficult to come to terms with your emotions. Give yourself permission to cry, to feel anger and guilt, and to accept these emotions as being perfectly normal. Consider confiding your worries in a professional counselor.

The maternity care services at Plantation General Hospital include a Level III NICU for babies who require critical care and a Level II NICU for newborns who are more stable. The team at our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Plantation, FL, provides compassionate parent education and discharge planning to help new families feel confident when it’s time to bring their little ones home. A registered nurse is available at 954-321-4099.


CDC Zika Health Advisory

This is an official

CDC HEALTH ADVISORY

Distributed via the CDC Health Alert Network

August 1, 2016, 1300 ET ( 1:00 PM ET)

CDCHAN-00393

CDC Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age for Zika Virus Infection Related to the Investigation for
Local Mosquito-borne Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade and
Broward Counties, Florida

Summary

The Florida Department of Health (FL DOH) has identified an area with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission (active Zika virus transmission) in Miami ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ intheus/florida-update.html ). Based on the earliest time of symptom onset and a maximal two-week incubation period for Zika virus, this guidance applies to women of reproductive age and their partners who live in or traveled to this area after June 15, 2016.

This is an ongoing investigation, and CDC is rapidly learning more about the extent of active Zika virus transmission in the area identified by the FL DOH. With the recommendations below, CDC is applying existing guidance to the occurrence of Zika virus transmission in this area of Florida. As more information becomes available, we will update these recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. Pregnant women should avoid non-essential travel to the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH.
  1. Pregnant women and their partners living in or traveling to the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH should follow steps to prevent mosquito bites ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ prevention/prevent-mosquito- bites.html ).
  1. Women and men who live in or who have traveled to the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH and who have a pregnant sex partner should consistently and correctly use condoms or other barriers to prevent infection during sex or not have sex for the duration of the pregnancy.
  1. All pregnant women in the United States should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure during each prenatal care visit. Women with ongoing risk of possible exposure include those who live in or frequently travel to the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH. Women with limited risk include those who traveled to the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH or had sex with a partner who lives in or traveled to the area with active Zika virus transmission without using condoms or other barrier methods to prevent infection. Each evaluation should include an assessment of signs and symptoms of Zika virus disease (acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, conjunctivitis), their travel history as well as their sexual partner’s potential exposure to Zika virus and history of any illness consistent with Zika virus disease to determine whether Zika virus testing is indicated.
  1. Pregnant women with possible exposure to Zika virus and signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease should be tested for Zika virus infection based on time of evaluation relative to symptom onset in accordance with CDC guidance ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_ cid=mm6529e1_e ).
  1. Pregnant women with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure and who do not report symptoms of Zika virus disease should be tested in the first and second trimester of pregnancy in accordance with CDC guidance ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_ cid=mm6529e1_e ).
  1. Pregnant women with limited risk and who do not report symptoms should consult with their healthcare providers to obtain testing for Zika virus infection based on the elapsed interval since their last possible exposure in accordance with CDC guidance ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_ cid=mm6529e1_e ).
  1. Women with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least six months after symptom onset to attempt conception.
  1. Women and men with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure who do not have signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease and are considering pregnancy should consult their healthcare provider. Due to the ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure, healthcare providers should discuss the risks of Zika, emphasize ways to prevent Zika virus infection, and provide information about safe and effective contraceptive methods. As part of their pregnancy planning and counseling with their health care providers, some women and their partners living in the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH might decide to delay pregnancy.
  1. Women and men with limited risk and who do not report signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks after last possible exposure to attempt conception.

Background

Zika is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito ( Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). Zika virus can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and severe fetal brain defects, and has been associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Most persons infected with Zika virus will not have symptoms; infants with microcephaly and other birth defects have been born to women with Zika virus infection who do not report symptoms.

CDC’s testing recommendations for pregnant women with ongoing or limited risk for possible Zika virus exposure who report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease (symptomatic pregnant women) are the same. Symptomatic pregnant women who are evaluated less than two weeks after symptom onset should receive serum and urine Zika virus rRT-PCR testing. Symptomatic pregnant women who are evaluated two to 12 weeks after symptom onset should first receive a Zika virus immunoglobulin (IgM) antibody test; if the IgM antibody test result is positive or equivocal (unclear), serum and urine rRT-PCR testing should be performed.

Testing recommendations for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease (asymptomatic pregnant women) differ based on the circumstances of possible exposure. For asymptomatic pregnant women with ongoing risk for possible exposure and who are evaluated less than two weeks after last possible exposure, rRT-PCR testing should be performed. If the rRT-PCR result is negative, a Zika virus IgM antibody test should be performed two to 12 weeks after the exposure. Asymptomatic pregnant with limited risk for possible exposure who are first evaluated 2–12 weeks after their last possible exposure should first receive a Zika virus IgM antibody test; if the IgM antibody test result is positive or equivocal, serum and urine rRT-PCR should be performed. Asymptomatic pregnant women with ongoing risk for possible exposure to Zika virus should receive Zika virus IgM antibody testing as part of routine obstetric care during the first and second trimesters; immediate rRT-PCR testing should be performed when IgM antibody test results are positive or equivocal.

Further information on the interpretation of testing results and clinical management of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection are available below.

For More Information

Summary: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc- providers/pregnant-woman.html

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protects people's health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhances health decisions by providing credible information on critical health issues; and promotes healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national, and international organizations.


A Parent's Guide to Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that may be life-threatening. It typically develops within seconds or minutes when the individual is exposed to the allergen. If your child has an allergy, you can find the pediatric care he or she needs at Plantation General Hospital. Your child’s physician will help you learn what to do in the event of a severe allergic reaction.

Why does anaphylaxis occur?
During an allergic reaction, the body’s immune system releases a flood of chemicals that result in allergy symptoms. In most cases, an allergic reaction isn’t life-threatening. However, it’s important for parents to be aware that even if a child has had a mild allergic reaction to something in the past, he or she could still develop a life-threatening allergic reaction to that same trigger in the future. Some of the allergens that may lead to anaphylaxis include penicillin, other medications, insect stings, and foods such as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish, and shellfish. Rarely, anaphylaxis may be triggered by exercise or by the consumption of certain foods followed by exercise.

What are the symptoms of anaphylaxis?
When a child develops any of the symptoms of anaphylaxis, he or she needs pediatric emergency care. These signs and symptoms can include swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, slurred speech, and dizziness. Anaphylaxis can cause fainting, heart palpitations, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps. It may result in a bluish skin color, weak and rapid pulse, and hives. In some cases, the symptoms may resolve, but then return within two or three hours and be much more severe.

What should I do when I notice these symptoms?
During a severe allergic reaction, do not try to drive your child to the ER yourself. Instead, call 911 immediately. If your child has an epinephrine auto-injector, follow the doctor’s instructions for its use. If your child loses consciousness, lay him or her flat on the floor and elevate the feet.

Parents are urged to call 911 without delay if their children display signs of anaphylaxis. For non-emergent inquiries about our pediatric care services available in Plantation, FL, parents can call Plantation General Hospital at 954-321-4099. We provide family-centered care within our Pediatric ER and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).


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